Polish companies do not train employees

06Wrz10

Two-thirds of Polish companies have problems finding employees, research carried out by the daily Puls Biznesu shows.

Despite the economic slowdown and high unemployment rate, employers cannot find new workers. 61% of surveyed companies have problems recruiting employees and only 16% said this problem was alleviated during the ‚crisis’. 9% of companies consider the problem is becoming more serious. The newspaper suggests that employers’ problems with finding suitable workers are caused by the misalignment of the educational system and market needs.

However, independent observers point out that Poland is considered to have one of the highest quality European educational systems, part-time studies by employees is high by European standards and that the Polish educational system’s balance between technical and academic education is still in the process of development. Such observers therefore consider the primary problem is inflexibility in the labour market, with employers having unreal expectations that the State will give them employees completely adjusted to their individual needs.

Although much political effort is expended on considering what government should do with the educational system, this can only ever have a marginal effect while political commentators such as ‚Puls Biznesu’ continue to regurgitate uninformed clichés that fail to address the real problem – companies need to train workers to meet their needs. Until they do this, Polish schools will continue to have a youth unemployment ratio only slightly better than the European average. That’s still pretty good though, isn’t it?

The above piece a complete rewrite of the Polish Market – Puls Biznesu article was submitted by Steve Woods. Absolutely brilliant. Steve is hereby awarded the coveted P2E ‚Aluminium Pencil Sharpener Award’. Well done Steve.



2 Responses to “Polish companies do not train employees”

  1. 1 Steve

    Thanks, but err… the last sentence?

    • 2 szczurekikret

      Ooops! It seemed redundant at the time, but I now realise that I should not have cut it. It’s going right back.


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